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The Jewish Museum is open today from 11 am - 5:45 pm.

Hours: Galleries

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  • Sunday 11 am – 5:45 pm
  • Monday 11 am – 5:45 pm
  • Tuesday 11 am – 5:45 pm
  • Wednesday Closed
  • Thursday 11 am – 8 pm
  • Friday 11 am – 4 pm
  • Saturday 11 am – 5:45 pm

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  • Adults $15
  • Seniors, 65 and over $12
  • Students $7.50
  • Children, 18 and under Free
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  • Thursdays, 5 – 8 pm Pay-What-You-Wish
  • Saturdays Free

The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York, NY 10128
212.423.3200

info@thejm.org
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Jewish Museum Members and visitors can park at Impark and Champion Parking. Read More

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Upcoming Events

Thu, Jan 18

Thursday, January 18, 2018

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10 AM

Members-Only Preview
Scenes from the Collection

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Fri, Jan 19

Friday, January 19, 2018

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10 AM

Members-Only Preview
Scenes from the Collection

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Fri, Jan 19

Friday, January 19, 2018

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2 PM

Gallery Talk
Pattern and Technique

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Sat, Jan 20

Saturday, January 20, 2018

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11 AM

Free Saturdays

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Sun, Jan 21

Sunday, January 21, 2018

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10 AM

Picture This!
Gallery Tour, Art Workshop & Concert

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Sun, Jan 21

Sunday, January 21, 2018

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10 AM

Members-Only Preview
Scenes from the Collection

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Sun, Jan 21

Sunday, January 21, 2018

|

11:30 AM

David Weinstone & the Music for Aardvarks Band
Family Concert

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Sun, Jan 21

Sunday, January 21, 2018

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12:30 PM

Studio Art Sessions
Painted Scene

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Wed, Jan 24

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

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2 PM

Verbal Description Tour
For Visitors Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision

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Who We Are

Welcome to the Jewish Museum, a museum in New York City at the intersection of art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds. Whether you visit our home in the elegant Warburg mansion on Museum Mile, or engage with us online, there is something for everyone. Through our exhibitions, programs, and collection of nearly 30,000 works of art, ceremonial objects, and media, visitors can journey through 4,000 years of art and Jewish culture from around the world.


As an art museum representing the diversity of Jewish culture and identity, the Jewish Museum believes in free expression and an open society. We embrace multiple viewpoints regardless of race, gender, national origin, or religion, and we oppose discrimination in all its forms.


Our exhibitions and public programs provide platforms for cross-cultural dialogue, fostering empathy, mutual understanding, and respect. We champion the powerful roles art and artists can play in our communities, both inside and outside the Museum’s walls.

Our Mission

The Jewish Museum is dedicated to the enjoyment, understanding, and preservation of the artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people through its unparalleled collections and distinguished exhibitions. Learn More

History

The Jewish Museum was founded in 1904 in the library of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where it was housed for more than four decades. Located along New York's Museum Mile, this elegant former residence has been the home of the Museum since 1947. Learn More

Stories

The Jewish Museum Remembers Kynaston McShine Read More

Kynaston McShine (center) at the opening of Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors, April 27-June 12, 1966. The Jewish Museum, NY.

The Jewish Museum is saddened to learn about the passing of Kynaston McShine (1935–2018). He was a visionary curator, and on the staff of the Jewish Museum from 1965–1967 as Curator of Painting and Sculpture, and from 1967–1968 as Acting Director. McShine organized many exhibitions including one-person shows of Gene Davis, Robert Irwin, Yves Klein, and Richard Smith, in addition to Large Scale American Paintings, Recent Italian Painting and Sculpture, for which he will long be remembered.

His groundbreaking 1966 exhibition Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors introduced a new generation of artists pushing the boundaries of painting and sculpture.

Installation view of the exhibition Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors, April 27-June 12, 1966. The Jewish Museum, NY.

While the exhibition is heralded as the first major U.S. exhibition devoted to minimal art, the term “minimalism” was not mentioned in McShine’s catalogue text for the show, nor did he attempt to categorize this new sculpture. Rather, he examined the artist’s fresh approaches to form and material, and more significantly, their use of (or lack of) color.

Installation view of the exhibition Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors, April 27-June 12, 1966. The Jewish Museum, NY.

McShine featured 42 artists in Primary Structures and included work by both Los Angeles and New York-based artists such as John McCracken, Larry Bell, Robert Morris, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Robert Smithson, Anne Truitt, Dan Flavin, and Judy Gerowitz (now Judy Chicago). Philip King, Michael Bolus, and David Annesley were among the artists selected from the U.K.

Installation view of the exhibition Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors, April 27-June 12, 1966. The Jewish Museum, NY.

The Jewish Museum Remembers Kynaston McShine was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Seeing Shapes in Faces and Patterns in Costumes Read More

Tips for Parents When Looking at Modigliani Unmasked and Veiled Meanings at the Jewish Museum

Modigliani Family Day at the Jewish Museum. Matthew Carasella/SocialShutterbug.com

The striking work of Italian-Jewish artist Amedeo Modigliani in the exhibition Modigliani Unmasked, and the vivid costumes from across the globe in Veiled Meanings: Fashioning Jewish Dress, from the Collection of The Israel Museum, Jerusalem offer families the opportunity to explore intriguing ideas and images together at the Jewish Museum.

Ahead of our exciting vacation week art workshops Express Yourself Through Costume, as well as a lively family concert with Oran Etkin, here are some tips for parents when exploring these exhibitions with children:

Download our Modigliani Unmasked Kids Gallery Guide for activities when exploring the exhibition together as a family, or from home.

1. Shape/Feature Hunt

Find Modigliani’s drawings of faces and ask your child to hunt for the shapes that form the features of the face. Is there an oval, triangle, or half-moon shape? What other familiar shapes do you see? Find an African mask on view in the exhibition and compare the shapes of the mask’s features to those in Modigliani’s drawings of faces. What shapes are similar or different? Why do you think Modigliani was fascinated by African masks?

Download our Modigliani Unmasked Kids Gallery Guide for activities when exploring the exhibition together as a family, or from home.

2. Pattern Play

Modigliani noticed how changing the shapes and placement of facial features and the shape of the face itself could result in entirely new drawings and sculptures. Walk around the Modigliani exhibition and ask your child to ‘collect’ shapes and patterns you both notice in the works of art. Suggest sketching them. Look for shapes that repeat and create patterns such as patterns in the hair of some of the figures.

In the Veiled Meanings exhibition, ask your child to search for patterns in the clothing on view. Which patterns are their favorite and why? Ask your child to describe the color combinations and other details in those patterns that grab their attention.

Download our Veiled Meanings Kids Gallery Guide for activities when exploring the exhibition together as a family, or from home.

3. Choose a Costume

Look around the Veiled Meanings exhibition together and choose a garment that each of you could imagine wearing. Did you choose different outfits? What is it about the clothing that you find most interesting? Is it the fabric’s texture, the colors, or the details and decoration? Does this costume remind you of something you have seen in the world around you? If you could imagine wearing the garment to a specific place — where might that be?

Prepare for your visit to the Jewish Museum by downloading our kids gallery guides for Modigliani and Veiled Meanings or pick one up at the Museum to find multiple ways to approach these exhibitions together.

— Rachel Katz Levine, Assistant Director of Family Programs and Rachael Abrams, Associate Manager of Studio Programs

Express Yourself Through Costume Vacation Week Art Workshops take place December 24–26, 28–29, 31, and included with Museum Admission; admission is free for children 18 and under. RSVP online.


Seeing Shapes in Faces and Patterns in Costumes was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Objects Tell Stories: Hanukkah in the White House Read More

In celebration of Hanukkah, Senior Curator Susan Braunstein recalls two visits to the White House Hanukkah celebration to meet Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama

Jewish Museum curator Susan Braunstein at the White House with President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush December 2001

Growing up in the wilds of East Flatbush in Brooklyn, where no famous people seemed to have ever lived, I never dreamed that I might meet the President of the United States. Yet, through my job as curator at the Jewish Museum, I was privileged to meet not one but two.

Hanukkah Lamp, BD, Lemberg (Lviv, Ukraine). 1867–72. Gift of Dr. Harry G. Friedman in memory of Adele Friedman

The first was George W. Bush. It was in December 2001, a few months after 9/11, and the nation was still reeling. The White House was having a Hanukkah lamp lighting ceremony, and a staff member asked if the Jewish Museum would supply the lamp. Since I was the resident expert on our Hanukkah lamp collection, I was asked to select the lamp and travel down to Washington to install it. The piece I chose was one of my favorites — an elaborate three-foot tall lamp of solid silver in Baroque style, made in Ukraine. For the lighting ceremony, the children of White House staff members said the blessings and got Hanukkah gifts, while their parents and I lined the sides of the room.

When the President entered the room, and then stood nearby to give a speech, I thought my heart would stop. I was totally unprepared for what happened afterward — he went down the line of parents, greeting them all. When he got to me, I had enough presence of mind to tell him who I was. He said something extremely gracious, but I was in such shock that I could not recall what he said.

Hanukkah Lamp, Landsberg am Lech, Germany, 1945, Gift of General Joseph T. McNarney

The second President was Barack Obama. In 2011, the Museum received a request for a Hanukkah lamp that related to the military, which was being honored at that year’s holiday celebration. The lamp we chose had been made in a Displaced Persons camp after World War II, and had been presented to General Joseph McNarney, who was in charge of the European Theater of Operations after the war. I returned to the White House to supervise the installation of the lamp and guard it during the party when the President spoke. All the guests, including me, took turns standing on line to have our picture taken with the President and First Lady. The process was extremely regulated — when an officer tapped me, I was to go stand in between the Obamas, and when he tapped me again, I was supposed to leave. I was therefore not expecting that they would actually speak to me (which they did). They could not have been more gracious or elegant, but again, due to my extreme state of awe, I have little recollection of what they said.

Jewish Museum curator Susan Braunstein at the White House with President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama December 2011

But at least I have two photographs of me with these past Presidents of the United States gracing the wall of my office — a reminder that a girl from Brooklyn can meet the most powerful person in America.

— Dr. Susan L. Braunstein, Senior Curator

To explore more Hanukkah lamps in the Jewish Museum collection, visit TheJewishMuseum.org/Collection.


Objects Tell Stories: Hanukkah in the White House was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Neckpiece by Kobi Halperin

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Modigliani Unmasked

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